Bellingham’s Waypoint Park Beach Makes Headlines

Waypoint Park beach, Bellingham, Washington. Photo courtesy of the Port of Bellingham.

Bellingham’s Waypoint Park beach made headlines on May 20th! The site cleanup and beach creation at Waypoint joins three others as winner of “America’s Best Restored Beach”, an award given each year by the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. Waypoint Park is one of two CGS projects to win this award: the Port of Bellingham’s Marine Park won the title in 2009.

The other 2019 winners are:

  • Caminada Headland, Louisiana
  • South Padre Island, Texas
  • Duval County, Florida

Congratulations to the project teams who restored these beaches!

Read the Bellingham Herald announcement here.

And the original ASBPA announcement with information on all the projects here.

Sunlight Shores Community Beach Restored

Happy New Year! This year we resolve to complete more shore armor removal projects like this one: Sunlight Shores community beach on Whidbey Island was once a bank lined with creosote treated wood piles, large angular boulders, debris, and fill. Now it is a beautiful, resilient beach with restored salt marsh habitat, new native plantings, and improved community beach access. To view a time lapse of the armor removal and beach restoration process, click on the video below or follow this link.

Here is the project in numbers:

  • 350 linear feet of shoreline restored
  • 72 cubic yards of toxic, creosote-treated wood piles removed
  • 355 cubic yards of boulders and debris removed
  • 5,250 square feet of upper beach including salt marsh habitat restored
  • 4 large logs, root wads, and other on-site logs installed for added protection

This was a project by the Northwest Straits Foundation with a grant from the Salmon Funding Recovery Board. CGS completed site assessments, meetings with landowners, site mapping, permit and final design drawings and assisted the NWSF with construction oversight. Here’s to more exciting restoration projects in the new year!

Oak Harbor Naval Base Armor Removal Completed

Armor removal was recently completed at the south-facing bluff and beach at the Naval Air Station on Whidbey Island, located south of Oak Harbor, Washington. A 1978 demonstration project by the US Army Corps of Engineers placed old tires, rocks, and creosoted wood at the base of the bluff as a “low-cost shore protection” solution. These armor materials had almost completely failed by 1979 and were removed from the south shore of the Maylors Point peninsula between Oak Harbor and Crescent Harbor in September and October of 2018.

The Northwest Straits Foundation sponsored the project, with Lisa Kaufman as the project manager. An estimated total of 1,300 old tires, up to 6,000 intertidal concrete bags, and over 1,380 cubic yards of treated wood, armor stone, intertidal angular rock, and artificial fill were removed from 1,800 FT of historical feeder bluff shore. CGS performed site mapping, feasibility, armor removal and restoration design, and assisted with construction oversight.

This project was identified as part of a GIS-based feasibility and benefit assessment aimed at identifying and ranking feeder bluff restoration projects in Island and East Jefferson Counties. For more information on this effort, please visit the Salish Sea Wiki page!

Visit the Northwest Straits Foundation website for more information on Maylor Point and other recent armor removal projects!

A new beach for Bellingham’s Waypoint Park

CGS completed beach concepts, designs, and construction planning for the new Waypoint Park beach in Bellingham, and is currently doing construction oversight as this new beach comes together. The beach involved the removal of a treated wood bulkhead, and is located on the former Georgia-Pacific pulp mill along downtown Bellingham’s waterfront. Check out the video below from the Bellingham Herald on the recent progress of the project! Visit the Bellingham Herald website to view more videos like this one about the progress of Waypoint Park, which is set to open in summer 2018.

Weaverling Spit Restoration Phase 3, Fidalgo Bay

In fall of 2017, Coastal Geologic Services completed Phase 3 of the Weaverling Spit Restoration project for the Samish Indian Nation. Weaverling Spit is located on the west shore of the Fidalgo Bay Aquatic Reserve, across from Marchs Point in Skagit County. The spit contains documented forage fish spawning beaches for surf smelt, which are an important food source for many marine mammals, birds, and fish — particularly salmon.

Over 200 cubic yards of rock and fill debris were removed from the rockery armor at the Samish RV parking area, and soft shore beach nourishment (sediment import) along with large wood installations were placed along the regraded upper beach to improve beach stability and forage fish spawning habitat.

This project occurred in three phases: Phase 1 was completed in 2009, Phase 2 was completed in 2012, and Phase 3 concluded in September 2017 after 2 years of work. CGS completed mapping, assessment, design, and monitoring, and assisted with planning and construction oversight for all three phases.